Advice

I had someone give my client and I advice the other day. Or a mere suggestion as she called it.
“When you feel pain, just breathe and the pain will go away. You (Marjorie) should remind him.” This does work sometimes, but, not always and more times than not, it doesn’t work within the first Twenty seconds of the spasm, or doesn’t work at all. When he spasms, all muscles are involved, including swallowing, lips and trachea, rib cage, everything. His lips purse together shut (breathing shallowly only out of his nose), his throat stiffens and his dystonia holds him in a un-choreographed movement, one that most bodies are not familiar with. So, he does his best, and once he has his breath back, tells himself to breath, till he somewhat relaxes. When I told her this along with my client she said “as long as you remember to breathe.” I looked at her, my client looked at her, he said loudly “I do breathe” and I said “don’t disregard the things he can’t help.”

I give a lot of advice. Most would say I’m bossy. Some may say I’m particular. Few would say I’m pushy. It’s okay, I’m all of those things. When it comes to advocating, yeah, I’m not so worried about the other physical able person, who can usually adapt.

I’m learning everyday how to better give advice and how to have more tact. Some clients like when I’m a little but rude or give attitude, because that’s what they would do. Others prefer to have a discussion that is clear and concise. Either way, all my clients don’t like getting advice on how to “better” their disability. It’s a bit of an insult to their sensibilities, especially because they have lived their life longer than you have.

On the other hand, I like getting advice as a personal support person. It gives me ideas and helps me better the way I support anyone or provide attendant care. Usually this advice comes from the person I support and that the best kind of advice.

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